Health data

On Friday, April 26, 2024, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) voted 3-2 to issue a final rule (the “final rule”) that expands the scope of the Health Breach Notification Rule (“HBNR”) to apply to health apps and similar technologies and broadens what constitutes a breach of security, among other updates.  We previously covered the proposed rule, which was issued on May 18, 2023.Continue Reading FTC Issues Final Rule to Expand Scope of the Health Breach Notification Rule

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focusses on the obligations of data users; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 3: The European Health Data Space from the Health Data User’s Perspective

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focusses on the obligations of data holders; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 2: The European Health Data Space from the Health Data Holder’s Perspective

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 1: Five Key Take Aways on Secondary Use of Health Data

Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA), the Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (“HELP”) Committee, published on February 21, 2024, a white paper with various proposals to update privacy protections for health data. In Part 1 of this blog series (see here), we discussed the first section of Senator Cassidy’s February 21, 2024, white paper. Specifically, we summarized Senator Cassidy’s proposals on how to update the existing framework of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, as amended, and its implementing regulations (collectively, “HIPAA”) without disrupting decades of case law and precedent. In this blog post, we discuss the other sections of the white paper, namely proposals to protect other sources of health data not currently covered by HIPAA.Continue Reading Senator Cassidy Issues White Paper with Proposals to Update Health Data Privacy Framework – Part 2: Safeguarding Health Data Not Covered by HIPAA 

On February 16, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published a final rule to amend the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder (“SUD”) Patient Records regulations (“Part 2”) to more closely align Part 2 with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended, and its implementing regulations (collectively, “HIPAA”) as required by Section 3221 of the 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  We previously covered the proposed rule (hereinafter, “the NPRM”), which was issued on December 2, 2022.

The final rule, issued through the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (“SAMHSA”), increases alignment between certain Part 2 requirements and HIPAA and it clarifies certain existing Part 2 permissions and restrictions to improve the ability of entities to use and disclose Part 2 records. According to HHS, this final rule will decrease burdens on patients and providers, improve coordination of care and access to care and treatment, and protect the confidentiality of treatment records.Continue Reading HHS Publishes Final Rule to Align Part 2 and HIPAA

On September 27, 2023, Governor Newsom signed AB 254 and AB 352, which both amend the California Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (“CMIA”).  Specifically, AB 254 expands the scope of the CMIA to expressly cover reproductive or sexual health services that are delivered through digital health solutions and the associated health information generated from these services.  AB 352 imposes new requirements on how electronic health record (“EHR”) systems must store medical information related to gender affirming care, abortion and related services, and contraception and the ability of providers of health care, health care service plans, contractors, or employers to disclose such information.Continue Reading California Enacts Amendments to the CMIA

Innovative digital solutions intended to address health issues typically experienced by women have been an area of increased focus.  Ranging from reproductive-related mobile applications to AI-enabled breast cancer screening devices, digital solutions for women+ health show promise to serve an enormous market with medical needs that have often failed to get the level of attention

On December 7, 2022, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), announced updates to the Mobile Health App Interactive Tool­—a questionnaire designed to help mobile health app developers identify federal laws and regulations that may apply to

On December 2, 2022, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), through the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (“SAMHSA”), issued a proposed rule to implement statutory amendments enacted by Section 3221 of the 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  Specifically