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Elizabeth Brim

Elizabeth Brim is an associate in the firm’s Washington, DC office. She is a member of the firm’s Health Care and Data Privacy and Cybersecurity Practice Groups, advising clients on a broad range of regulatory and compliance issues. In addition, Elizabeth maintains an active pro bono practice.

Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA), the Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (“HELP”) Committee, published on February 21, 2024, a white paper with various proposals to update privacy protections for health data. In Part 1 of this blog series (see here), we discussed the first section of Senator Cassidy’s February 21, 2024, white paper. Specifically, we summarized Senator Cassidy’s proposals on how to update the existing framework of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, as amended, and its implementing regulations (collectively, “HIPAA”) without disrupting decades of case law and precedent. In this blog post, we discuss the other sections of the white paper, namely proposals to protect other sources of health data not currently covered by HIPAA.Continue Reading Senator Cassidy Issues White Paper with Proposals to Update Health Data Privacy Framework – Part 2: Safeguarding Health Data Not Covered by HIPAA 

On February 21, 2024, Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA), the Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (“HELP”) Committee, issued a white paper, “Strengthening Health Data Privacy for Americans: Addressing the Challenges of the Modern Era,” which proposes several updates to the privacy protections for health data. This follows Senator Cassidy’s September 2023 request for information from stakeholders about how to enhance health data privacy protections covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) framework and to consider privacy protections for other sources of health data not currently covered by HIPAA. The white paper notes that several entities, including trade associations, hospitals, health technology companies, and think tanks, responded to the RFI.Continue Reading Senator Cassidy Issues White Paper with Proposals to Update Health Data Privacy Framework – Part 1: Updates to the HIPAA Framework

On February 16, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published a final rule to amend the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder (“SUD”) Patient Records regulations (“Part 2”) to more closely align Part 2 with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended, and its implementing regulations (collectively, “HIPAA”) as required by Section 3221 of the 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  We previously covered the proposed rule (hereinafter, “the NPRM”), which was issued on December 2, 2022.

The final rule, issued through the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (“SAMHSA”), increases alignment between certain Part 2 requirements and HIPAA and it clarifies certain existing Part 2 permissions and restrictions to improve the ability of entities to use and disclose Part 2 records. According to HHS, this final rule will decrease burdens on patients and providers, improve coordination of care and access to care and treatment, and protect the confidentiality of treatment records.Continue Reading HHS Publishes Final Rule to Align Part 2 and HIPAA

On September 27, 2023, Governor Newsom signed AB 254 and AB 352, which both amend the California Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (“CMIA”).  Specifically, AB 254 expands the scope of the CMIA to expressly cover reproductive or sexual health services that are delivered through digital health solutions and the associated health information generated from these services.  AB 352 imposes new requirements on how electronic health record (“EHR”) systems must store medical information related to gender affirming care, abortion and related services, and contraception and the ability of providers of health care, health care service plans, contractors, or employers to disclose such information.Continue Reading California Enacts Amendments to the CMIA

On December 19, 2022, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) issued a proposed rule to adopt standards for certain electronic health transactions.  Specifically, the proposed rule would adopt standards for health care attachment transactions (e.g., medical charts, x-rays, provider notes) and electronic signatures to be used in conjunction with health care attachments, and modify the standard for referral certification and authorization transaction.  The proposed rule would apply to entities regulated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended, and its implementing regulations (collectively, “HIPAA”), and would implement certain requirements of the Administrative Simplification subtitle of HIPAA and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) that require the Secretary of HHS to adopt and update standards for electronic health transactions, code sets, unique identifiers, as well as the electronic exchange for health information.Continue Reading HHS Proposes Rule to Improve Standards for Electronic Prior Authorizations and Other Transactions with Health Care Attachments

On December 7, 2022, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), announced updates to the Mobile Health App Interactive Tool­—a questionnaire designed to help mobile health app developers identify federal laws and regulations that may apply to

On December 2, 2022, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”), through the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (“SAMHSA”), issued a proposed rule to implement statutory amendments enacted by Section 3221 of the 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”).  Specifically

On September 28, the governor of California signed into law AB 2089, which expands the scope of California’s Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (“CMIA”) to cover mental health services that are delivered through digital health solutions and the associated health information generated from these services. Continue Reading California Expands the Scope of the CMIA to Cover Certain Digital Mental Health Services and Information

On April 6, 2022, the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) at the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published a request for information (“RFI”) seeking public comment on implementing certain provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (“HITECH”) Act, indicating that a rulemaking or further guidance related to the HITECH Act may be forthcoming.  Specifically, the RFI seeks input as to how covered entities and business associates are voluntarily implementing recognized security practices.  OCR will consider the implementation of such practices when making certain determinations relating to the resolution of potential violations of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) Security Rule.  The RFI also seeks input on the process for distributing to harmed individuals a percentage of civil monetary penalties (“CMPs”) or monetary settlements collected pursuant to the HITECH Act.  Although HIPAA does not provide a private right of action, the potential for sharing in monetary penalties or settlements could incentivize individuals to report potential HIPAA violations to OCR.
Continue Reading OCR Seeks Comments Related to Recognized Security Practices and Distribution of Civil Monetary Penalties under the HITECH Act

On January 21, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced new resources to help companies determine their obligations under the Health Breach Notification Rule (the “Rule”): the Health Breach Notification Rule: Basics for Business, which provides a quick introduction to the Rule, and Complying with FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule (“Compliance Guidance”), a more in-depth compliance guidance.  These resources follow the FTC’s September 2021 Policy Statement, which expanded the Rule’s application to the developers of health apps, connected devices, and similar products, and similarly emphasize the FTC’s continued scrutiny of health technology.
Continue Reading FTC Releases New Health Breach Notification Rule Guidance, Targets Health Apps and Connected Devices