European Union

In March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  Although the text has not yet been formally adopted by all the European institutions, a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focuses on the governance and enforcement of the EHDS; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

The final text of the EHDS was adopted by the European Parliament on 24 April 2024 and is expected to be formally adopted by the European Council in the coming months.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 5: European Health Data Space Governance, Enforcement and Timelines

On April 22, 2024, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (“EFPIA”) issued a statement on the application of the AI Act in the medicinal product lifecycle. The EFPIA statement highlights that AI applications are likely to play an increasing role in the development and manufacture of medicines.  As drug development is already governed by a longstanding and detailed EU regulatory framework, EFPIA stresses that care should be taken to ensure that any rules on the use of AI are fit-for-purpose, adequately tailored, risk-based, and do not duplicate existing rules.  The statement sets forth five “considerations”:Continue Reading EFPIA Issues Statement on Application of the AI Act in the Medicinal Product Lifecycle

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted. This article focuses on the implications for “wellness applications” and medical devices; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

The final text of the EHDS was adopted by the European Parliament on 24 April 2024 and is expected to be formally adopted by the European Council in the coming months.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 4: The European Health Data Space’s Implications for “Wellness Applications” and Medical Devices

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focusses on the obligations of data users; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 3: The European Health Data Space from the Health Data User’s Perspective

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.  This article focusses on the obligations of data holders; for an overview of the EHDS generally, see our first post in this series.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 2: The European Health Data Space from the Health Data Holder’s Perspective

In early March 2024, the EU lawmakers reached agreement on the European Health Data Space (EHDS).  For now, we only have a work-in-progress draft version of the text, but a number of interesting points can already be highlighted.

We expect the final text of the EHDS to be adopted by the European Parliament in April 2024 and by the EU Member States shortly thereafter.Continue Reading EHDS Series – 1: Five Key Take Aways on Secondary Use of Health Data

On December 5, 2023, the Spanish presidency of the Council of the EU issued a declaration to strengthen collaboration with Member States and the European Commission to develop a leading quantum technology ecosystem in Europe.

The declaration acknowledges the revolutionary potential of quantum computing, which uses quantum mechanics principles and quantum bits known as “qubits” to solve complex mathematical problems exponentially faster than classical computers.

The declaration was launched with eight Member State signatories (Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Slovenia, and Sweden), and invites other Member States to sign. By doing so, they agree to recognize the “strategic importance of quantum technologies for the scientific and industrial competitiveness of the EU” and commit to collaborating to make Europe the “’quantum valley’ of the world, the leading region globally for quantum excellence and innovation.Continue Reading Quantum Computing: Action in the EU and Potential Impacts

Hot on the heels of recent announcements from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (see our prior blogs here), the European Medicines Agency (“EMA”) has joined the conversation on the use of Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) and Machine Learning (“ML”) technologies in the medicinal product lifecycle.

AI and ML have the potential to enhance every

The Medical Device Coordination Group (“MDCG”) has published a new position paper (MDCG 2022-14) acknowledging the significant and urgent lack of capacity of EU notified bodies.  It acknowledges the risk that this could lead to many existing and new medical devices and in vitro diagnostic medical devices (“IVDs”) not

In April 2021, the European Commission released its proposed Regulation Laying Down Harmonized Rules on Artificial Intelligence (the “Regulation”), which would establish rules on the development, placing on the market, and use of artificial intelligence systems (“AI systems”) across the EU. The proposal, comprising 85 articles and nine annexes, is part of a wider package of Commission initiatives aimed at positioning the EU as a world leader in trustworthy and ethical AI and technological innovation.

The Commission’s objectives with the Regulation are twofold: to promote the development of AI technologies and harness their potential benefits, while also protecting individuals against potential threats to their health, safety, and fundamental rights posed by AI systems. To that end, the Commission proposal focuses primarily on AI systems identified as “high-risk,” but also prohibits three AI practices and imposes transparency obligations on providers of certain non-high-risk AI systems as well. Notably, it would impose significant administrative costs on high-risk AI systems of around 10 percent of the underlying value, based on compliance, oversight, and verification costs. This blog highlights several key aspects of the proposal.
Continue Reading European Commission Proposes New Artificial Intelligence Regulation