European Medicines Agency (EMA)

On 15 February 2019, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Heads of Medicines Agencies (HMA) published their Joint Big Data Taskforce’s summary report (available here) setting out recommendations for understanding the acceptability of evidence derived from ‘big data’ in support of the evaluation and supervision of medicines by regulators.

The Taskforce has sought to clarify the meaning of ‘big data’ within the medicines regulatory context, defining it within the report as: “extremely large datasets which may be complex, multi-dimensional, unstructured and heterogeneous, which are accumulating rapidly and which may be analysed computationally to reveal patterns, trends, and associations. In general big data sets require advanced or specialised methods to provide an answer within reliable constraints”.

The Taskforce was split into seven sub-groups, each focusing on different categories of datasets:

  1. Clinical trials and imaging;
  2. Observational (or ‘Real World’) data;
  3. Spontaneous adverse drug reports (ADR);
  4. Social media and mobile health;
  5. Genomics;
  6. Bioanalytical ‘omics (with a focus on proteomics); and
  7. Data analytics (this work is ongoing and cuts across the above six sub-groups; a further report is expected in Q1 2019).

The sub-groups were each asked, amongst other thing, to characterise their respective datasets; consider the specific areas where big data usability and applicability may add value; assess the existing competencies and expertise present across the European regulatory network regarding the analysis and interpretation of big data; and provide a list of recommendations and a ‘Big Data Roadmap’.

Continue Reading EMA-HMA joint taskforce publish report outlining recommendations for using ‘big data’ for medicines regulation

On 14 September 2017, the Committee for Human Medicinal Products (“CHMP”) of the European Medicines Agency adopted ICH Guideline E18 (the “Guideline”) on genomic sampling and the management of genomic data.  The Guideline takes effect on 28 February 2018.

The International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (“ICH”) developed the Guideline in acknowledgement of the growing awareness of, and interest in, genomic data generated from clinical studies.  The ICH suggested that the absence of a harmonized guideline made it more difficult to conduct genomic research consistently in global studies.  The fact that the CHMP has adopted the Guideline means that EU guidance on this subject is now aligned with the ICH standard.

The Guideline provides general principles for the collection and handling of genomic samples and management of genomic data.  It also affirms broader principles, such as the need for informed consent and the protection of subjects’ privacy etc.  The Guideline applies to both interventional and non-interventional clinical studies, irrespective of when the genomic research is carried out and whether it was envisaged in the study protocol.  The ICH/CHMP intend the Guideline to be interpreted in accordance with the law and policies in each jurisdiction where genomic research takes place.
Continue Reading CHMP Adopts Guideline on Genomic Sampling and Management of Genomic Data