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Ramy Ramadan

Ramy Ramadan's practice focuses on mergers and acquisitions and project development and finance transactions. Mr. Ramadan also advises clients on general corporate matters, securities offerings, and technology and IP transactions.

StartUp Health, a New York-based accelerator, and Rock Health, a San Francisco-based seed fund, each recently released its independent 2015 mid-year report on venture funding and transactional data of the digital health sector.  The following are some key observations:

  • Funding Levels Are Keeping Up With the Record-Breaking Levels in 2014. While this year

StartUp Health, a New York-based accelerator, and Rock Health, a San Francisco-based seed fund, each recently released its independent 2015 first quarter report on venture funding and transactional data of the digital health sector. The following are some key observations:

  • Funding is Down Compared to Last Year’s First Quarter. While 2014 was a record-breaking year for digital health funding—increasing by more than double compared to 2013—both reports show that 2015 is off to a slower start. StartUp Health reported a decrease in overall venture funding in the digital health sector from $1.5 billion in the first quarter of 2014 to $900 million in the first quarter of 2015, while Rock Health, which uses different reporting metrics, reported a decrease from $700 million in the first quarter of 2014 to $630 million in the first quarter of 2015.

Continue Reading Digital Health Venture Funding and M&A Activity in the First Quarter of 2015

Healthcare providers, health plans, and other entities are increasingly utilizing cloud services to collect, aggregate, store and process data.  A recent report by IDC Health Insights suggests that 80 percent of healthcare data is expected to pass through the cloud by 2020.  As a substantial amount of healthcare data comprises “personal information” or “protected health information” (PHI), federal and state privacy and security laws, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, raise significant questions for healthcare providers and health plans utilizing the cloud in connection with such data.  Such questions include whether HIPAA requirements extend to cloud providers, how and if entities storing health data on the cloud will be notified in case of a breach, and whether storage of data overseas by cloud providers triggers any additional obligations or concerns.
Continue Reading Moving to the Cloud: Some Key Considerations for Healthcare Entities