Stakeholders across the healthcare, technology and communications industries seek to harness the power of data and information technology to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their products, solutions and services, create new and cutting-edge innovations, and achieve better outcomes for patients. Partnering with lawyers who understand how the regulatory, IP, and commercial pieces of the digital health puzzle fit together is essential. Covington offers unsurpassed breadth and depth of expertise and experience concerning the legal, regulatory, and policy issues that affect digital health products and services. To learn more, click here.

On February 1, 2018, Covington’s Digital Health team hosted a webinar examining U.S. and EU regulatory issues for digital health associated with pharmaceuticals.  Here are some key takeaways from that webinar:

  • Neela Paykel from Proteus Digital Health, noted that “you need to think outside the box for how to engage, whether you’re a pharma company

On December 8, FDA addressed the agency’s evolving approach to digital health by issuing two new draft guidance documents: “Clinical and Patient Decision Support Software” (the “CDS Draft Guidance”) and “Changes to Existing Medical Software Policies Resulting From Section 3060 of the 21st Century Cures Act” (the “Software Policies Draft Guidance”). These draft guidances announce the agency’s initial interpretation of the health software provisions enacted as part of last year’s 21st Century Cures Act (the “Cures Act”).

Given the rapid pace of digital health innovation across the life sciences, technology and health care sectors, FDA guidance on these topics is critical. Here are a few key takeaways from the draft guidances:

  • FDA’s initial interpretation of the Cures Act provision related to clinical decision support (CDS) software may lead to a fairly narrow carve-out—in other words, many cutting-edge CDS software functions could remain subject to FDA regulation.
  • FDA’s draft guidances do not directly address dynamic digital health solutions, such as those that incorporate machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), or blockchain.
  • FDA has proposed an enforcement discretion approach for decision support software aimed at patients that generally parallels the regulatory approach for CDS software aimed at clinicians, even though patient decision software was not addressed directly in the Cures Act.
  • Consistent with the Cures Act, FDA’s draft guidances reflect that many of the software functions that were previously subject to FDA enforcement discretion (i.e., not actively regulated as devices) no longer meet the definition of “device.”
  • Significant for pharmaceutical companies, CDER joined one of the draft guidances, and that draft guidance makes clear that other FDA requirements may apply to digital health products disseminated by or on behalf of a drug sponsor beyond those outlined in the draft guidance.

FDA’s regulatory approach has a significant impact on the investment in and development of digital health solutions across the digital health ecosystem. Stakeholders should consider submitting comments to the agency to help shape the direction of FDA’s final guidances on these topics.


Continue Reading FDA Outlines Updated Approach to Regulating Digital Health Technologies

Digital Health

In this bonus edition of our checkup series, Covington’s global cross-practice Digital Health team considers some additional key questions about product liability and insurance coverage that companies across the life sciences and technology sectors should be asking as they seek to fit together the regulatory and commercial pieces of the complex digital health puzzle.

1. What are the key questions when crafting warnings and disclosures?

If your product is regulated, your warnings and disclosures will need to comply with any relevant regulations. In the case of a product not regulated by the FDA or equivalent regulatory body, first consider how your warnings and disclosures will be incorporated into the use of the product.

Some disclosures, like an explanation of the data source used by software, may fit best in terms and conditions that a user sees before using the product. Key warnings, however, may be more appropriately placed as part of the user experience.

Example: A warning that patients should consult their doctors if necessary may need to be placed in proximity to specific medical content.

Best Practice: Consider your intended audience: are you writing warnings for doctors, patients, or institutions? The appropriate types of disclosures will vary across populations. Patient-directed warnings may also need to be written in simplified language.

Best Practice: Consider whether it is appropriate for your product to have users to accept or otherwise be required to agree to the warnings and disclosures.


Continue Reading Digital Health Checkup (Bonus): Product Liability and Insurance Coverage

In the third installment of our series, Covington’s global cross-practice Digital Health team considers some additional key questions about Artificial Intelligence (AI), data privacy, and cybersecurity that companies across the life sciences and technology sectors should be asking to address the regulatory and commercial pieces of the complex digital health puzzle.

AI, Data Privacy, and

According to a distinguished panel of lawyers from MSD and Covington & Burling, companies involved in Digital Health deals need to ask themselves the following questions:

  • What data is required to develop and deliver the Digital Health solution, and does your company have sufficient expertise in-house to analyze the data?
  • What happens if your technology

Digital Health

In the second of a three-part series, Covington’s global cross-practice Digital Health team considers some additional key questions that companies across the life sciences, technology, and communications industries should be asking as they seek to fit together the regulatory and commercial pieces of the complex digital health puzzle.

Key Commercial Questions When
Contracting for Digital

Digital Health

In the first of a three-part series, Covington’s global cross-practice Digital Health team answers key questions that companies across the life sciences, technology, and communications industries should be asking as they seek to fit together the regulatory and commercial pieces of the complex digital health puzzle.

Key Regulatory Questions About Digital Health Solutions

1. What

On December 13, 2016, President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act (“Cures Act”), Pub. L. 114-255, which aims to expand medical research and expedite the approvals of drug therapies for patients.  The Cures Act also contains several provisions related to the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules.  None of these provisions make substantive changes to the HIPAA regulations at this time; in several instances, they direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) to study whether the HIPAA regulations should be revised or clarified to remove any potential barriers to optimal patient care and communication or to the availability of patient information for medical research.

Continue Reading Twenty-First Century Cures Act Includes HIPAA Provisions