Software development can teach us a lot about streamlining the research and development (R&D) process in other industries.  “Agile development”, or the process of dividing up an R&D project into smaller, more iterative segments instead of planning the entire project at its inception, is a hallmark of the software development process.  In a recently published article in Food and Beverage Insider entitled “The ‘Agile’ Path to Market: An Alternative Approach to Food Industry R&D”, Nigel Howard and Chase Brennick show how agile development can be valuable for R&D in many different contexts.   The article focuses on the suitability of agile development for R&D within the food industry, but illustrates the benefits of an agile R&D process for industries that are subject to evolving consumer preferences and rapidly changing regulatory landscapes – characteristics that are also present for companies in the digital-health space.  As described in the article, agile development could be a powerful tool to help digital health companies make their R&D more nimble and maintain greater oversight of the development process on a near-real-time basis.

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Photo of Nigel Howard Nigel Howard

Nigel Howard’s practice focuses on technology, outsourcing, and intellectual property issues. He represents clients in complex technology transactions, including outsourcing, licensing, corporate partnering, and strategic alliance transactions. Mr. Howard also has experience representing clients during IP property purchases and sales, and in reviews…

Nigel Howard’s practice focuses on technology, outsourcing, and intellectual property issues. He represents clients in complex technology transactions, including outsourcing, licensing, corporate partnering, and strategic alliance transactions. Mr. Howard also has experience representing clients during IP property purchases and sales, and in reviews of IP portfolios in relation to corporate financing and merger and acquisition transactions. His experience includes cross-border technology transfers, development and testing arrangements, distribution channels, technology deployment, and electronic commerce as well as privacy laws with regard to electronic databases and online services.