On February 1, 2018, Covington’s Digital Health team hosted a webinar examining U.S. and EU regulatory issues for digital health associated with pharmaceuticals.  Here are some key takeaways from that webinar:

  • Neela Paykel from Proteus Digital Health, noted that “you need to think outside the box for how to engage, whether you’re a pharma company or a digital health company.  For pharmaceuticals, you have to understand that there’s more risk tolerance in the technology space.  For digital health companies, you have to understand healthcare regulation and appreciate all the regulations pharmaceutical companies are dealing with on a regular basis.”
  • Grant Castle from Covington’s London office described how “it’s tempting to think once you’ve understood the regulations, you can enter the market with a digital health product, but in many respects, that’s the start of the challenge.  Systems for pricing and reimbursement of digital health offerings have yet to evolve fully.  It can also be challenging for a pharmaceutical company to offer digital health products where regulations might prohibit pharmaceutical companies from providing incentives to healthcare professionals for its products.  Such issues mean that you need to think strategically.” Sarah Cowlishaw added that digital technologies are being used in drug development, particularly to help collect real world evidence.  Companies thinking about digital health in drug development need to consider other challenges such as data reliability, consent, and operability with other platforms.
  • Christina Kuhn described how different centers within FDA might decide whether a digital health solution is regulated as a device and whether a digital health solution would affect a pharma company’s responsibilities for a drug. Wade Ackerman noted that “companies approaching FDA should think carefully about how to present FDA with the information it needs to understand and assess the digital health innovation.  How companies approach the agency will depend on the particular digital health technology, including how it relates to a pharmaceutical product.”

Neela Paykel is general counsel at Proteus Digital Health.  Wade Ackerman (Los Angeles), Grant Castle (London), Christina Kuhn (DC), Sarah Cowlishaw (London) are all members of Covington’s global Food, Drug, and Device Regulatory Group and part of Covington’s cross-practice Digital Health team.  If you would like to view a recording of this webinar, please contact Jordyn Pedersen at jpedersen@cov.com.

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Photo of Grant Castle Grant Castle

Grant Castle is a partner in the London office practicing in the areas of life sciences regulatory law, with an emphasis on pharmaceutical and medical device regulation.

His advice on general regulatory matters includes: adverse event and other reporting obligations, manufacturing controls, labeling…

Grant Castle is a partner in the London office practicing in the areas of life sciences regulatory law, with an emphasis on pharmaceutical and medical device regulation.

His advice on general regulatory matters includes: adverse event and other reporting obligations, manufacturing controls, labeling and promotion, and product life cycle management.  He has also advised extensively on EC and national laws governing clinical research, data protection, and the regulatory status of borderline products.

He has developed considerable expertise in coordinating regulatory projects covering jurisdictions outside of Europe, including Canada, South America, Eastern Europe, Russia, Africa, the Middle East, Japan, and Australia.  His transactional work includes advice on regulatory aspects of mergers and acquisitions, licensing, and collaborative arrangements.

Grant is a visiting lecturer at the University of Surrey, on a course leading to a Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Medicine/Clinical Pharmacology; Cardiff University, on a course leading to a Master of Science/Diploma in Clinical Research and on the Postgraduate Course in Pharmaceutical Medicine; and, Cranfield University, on a course leading to Master of Science, Postgraduate Diploma, and Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Technology Regulatory Affairs.  Grant is recognized by Chambers UK, Life Sciences as “excellent,” “a knowledgeable lawyer with a strong presence in the industry,” who provides “absolutely first-rate regulatory advice,” according to sources, who also describe him as “one of the key players” in that area,” whilst Chambers Global sources report that “he worked in the sector for many years, and has a thorough understanding of how the industry ticks.”  He is praised by clients for his “absolutely first-rate” European regulatory practice.  Legal 500 UK notes that he is “‘highly competent in understanding legal and technical biological issues.”

Photo of Sarah Cowlishaw Sarah Cowlishaw

Advising clients on a broad range of life sciences matters, Sarah Cowlishaw supports innovative pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, diagnostic and software technology companies on regulatory, compliance, transactional, and legislative matters.

Sarah has particular expertise in advising on legal issues presented by digital health…

Advising clients on a broad range of life sciences matters, Sarah Cowlishaw supports innovative pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, diagnostic and software technology companies on regulatory, compliance, transactional, and legislative matters.

Sarah has particular expertise in advising on legal issues presented by digital health technologies, helping companies navigate regulatory frameworks while balancing challenges presented by the pace of technological change over legislative developments.

Sarah is a co-chair of Covington’s multidisciplinary Digital Health Initiative, and is the Graduate Recruitment Partner for Covington’s London office.

Sarah regularly advises on:

  • classification determinations for software medical devices, including on developments resulting from the implementation of the EU Medical Devices Regulation;
  • legal issues presented by digital health technologies including artificial intelligence;
  • general regulatory matters for the pharma and device industry, including borderline determinations, adverse event and other reporting obligations, manufacturing controls, and labeling and promotion;
  • the full range of agreements that span the product life-cycle in the life sciences sector, including collaborations and other strategic agreements, clinical trial agreements, and manufacturing and supply agreements; and
  • regulatory and commercial due diligence for life sciences transactions.

Sarah’s pro bono work includes advising the Restoration of Appearance and Function Trust (RAFT) on the classification of a wound healing product containing human blood derivatives, and assisting in a project aimed at improving regulatory systems for clinical trials of drugs and vaccines for neglected diseases in developing countries.

Sarah has been recognized as one of the UK’s Rising Stars by Law.com (2021), which lists 25 up and coming female lawyers in the UK. She was named among the Hot 100 by The Lawyer (2020) and was included in the 50 Movers & Shakers in BioBusiness 2019 for advancing legal thinking for digital health.

Sarah has undertaken several client secondments, including to the in-house legal department of a multinational pharmaceutical company.

Photo of Wade Ackerman Wade Ackerman

Through more than a decade of experience in private practice and positions within the FDA and on the Hill, Wade Ackerman has acquired unique insights into the evolving legal and regulatory landscape facing companies marketing FDA-regulated products. Mr. Ackerman advises clients on FDA…

Through more than a decade of experience in private practice and positions within the FDA and on the Hill, Wade Ackerman has acquired unique insights into the evolving legal and regulatory landscape facing companies marketing FDA-regulated products. Mr. Ackerman advises clients on FDA regulatory matters across a range of sectors, including drugs and biologics, cosmetics, medical devices and diagnostics, and digital health products and services associated with drugs and traditional devices. He serves as one of the leaders of Covington’s multidisciplinary Digital Health Initiative, which brings together the firm’s considerable resources across the broad array of legal, regulatory, commercial, and policy issues relating to the development and marketing of digital health technologies.

Photo of Christina Kuhn Christina Kuhn

Christina Kuhn provides pharmaceutical and medical device companies advice on a variety of federal and state regulatory matters.

Covington Digital Health Team

Stakeholders across the healthcare, technology and communications industries seek to harness the power of data and information technology to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their products, solutions and services, create new and cutting-edge innovations, and achieve better outcomes for patients. Partnering with…

Stakeholders across the healthcare, technology and communications industries seek to harness the power of data and information technology to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their products, solutions and services, create new and cutting-edge innovations, and achieve better outcomes for patients. Partnering with lawyers who understand how the regulatory, IP, and commercial pieces of the digital health puzzle fit together is essential. Covington offers unsurpassed breadth and depth of expertise and experience concerning the legal, regulatory, and policy issues that affect digital health products and services. To learn more, click here.